About

About Setpoint


Years in Business

Skilled Employees

Of our customers' parts picked, placed, assembled, tested, and inspected

Sq. Ft. of Manufacturing Space

Setpoint was founded by Joe Cornwell and Joe VanDenBerghe in a public library in 1992. “The Joes,” as they are affectionately known, built Setpoint on a foundation of strict project management and open book finance.

Management Team

Mark Coy

Mark Coy

President and CEO

Josh Hays

Josh Hays

Manager: Sales, Marketing & BD

Scott Sheffield

Scott Sheffield

Controls Engineering Manager

Jason Munns

Jason Munns

Chief Operations Officer

Joe Knight

Joe Knight

Chief Financial Officer

DJ Feller

DJ Feller

Shop Manager

Steve Nuetzman

Steve Nuetzman

Chief Technology Officer

Clark Carlile

Clark Carlile

VP Sales & Marketing

Malorie Rasmussen

Malorie Rasmussen

Manager: Supply Chain

William Fitzgerald

William Fitzgerald

Manager: Engineering & Supply Chain

Don Tyze

Don Tyze

Manager: Production

Steve Schultz

Steve Schultz

Manager: Red Rock Machine & Tool


Setpoint’s History

Setpoint was founded by Joe Cornwell and Joe VanDenBerghe in a public library in 1992. “The Joes,” as they are affectionately known, wanted to build a company that was more than just another engineering house. Based on failures with a previous employer, they were determined to build Setpoint on a strict project management foundation. The Joes wanted their company to maintain a continuous understanding of where it stood in relation to its customers’ budget. Not only did they want to know where they stood but they wanted every employee to understand where the company stood on its projects. They recruited Joe Knight (another Joe!) to design and implement an open book finance program that has revolutionized project management. This new project management and open book finance program took on a life of its own and is still a key component to Setpoint’s success today. Each week, the entire staff is debriefed on the company’s progress with its projects. For 25 years Setpoint has shown the world how much fun engineers can really have! Setpoint has helped to implement lean manufacturing into some of the most exciting industries in the world. Thrilling amusement park rides? Check. High powered ammunition equipment? Check. Exotic automobiles? Check. Don’t worry though, we work in boring industries too. Setpoint is the leader in custom automation equipment for manufacturing companies who need to assemble, test, or inspect their products. Setpoint may have been born in a public library but it now thrives in over 92,000 sq ft of state-of-the-art industrial space dedicated to bringing our customers’ projects to life.


since —

1992


Setpoint Timeline

Fast Facts

Over the years we’ve done a few things that other people think are cool enough to tell the world:

  • Founded 1992
  • 109+ employees
  • 1,000+ custom machines built
  • 10,000+ tasks and processes automated
  • 10,000,000,000+ parts picked, placed, assembled, tested, inspected
  • 92,000 sq ft for designing, building and testing industrial automation equipment in two facilities in Ogden, Utah
  • 2 books published by Harvard Business Review:
  • Inc. 500 Fastest Growing Companies: 1999
  • Utah Top 100 Private Companies: 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001
  • Profiled by Inc. in Sept 2001 feature article: “What’s Your Culture Worth?”
  • Utah Manufacturers Association 2014 Manufacturer of the Year

Our Values

Strict Project Management: Our founders built Setpoint on their approach to project management, formed from experiences they had at other firms where they found it lacking. In time they refined their approach, and later we wrote the book on project management. As we design and build industrial automation equipment, our method grants us a continuous, live look at where any given project is in relation to completion and to the customer’s budget. Every employee on the project has access to this view and accounts for their contributions to it. Open-Book Finance: The financial component of our project management approach came from our third Joe. For each project, team members can track and view the financial status of a project they are on, which allows everyone to make more informed contributions and bring about a project’s success. At a company level, our entire staff is debriefed weekly on the progress of projects as well as our company goals.

Our Work with Industrial Automation Equipment

Is Lean. Our experts design industrial automation equipment using lean principles:

  • Understand value in the eyes of the Customer
  • Understand the Value Stream
  • Make the Value Stream Flow
  • Continuously Improve

Is Flexible. “Just in time” production means having the ability to adjust on the fly and quickly shift from one output to another. We design systems with Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED) so operators can easily change production parameters and seamlessly move from one job to the next, with minimal machine downtime. Is Reliable. Every machine gets tested for durability and reliability before we ship it. It’s inevitable that parts wear and need replacement, so we find out in advance what to expect, and then build monitoring systems and replacement schedules so that you can maximize uptime and productivity. Is Fast. Because of our strict project management, we deliver on schedule and under budget. No one does industrial automation equipment as fast as us.

Latest Blog Posts

How far can you take lean manufacturing practices before you cross the line of what makes sense economically versus doing what a pure lean implementation tells you that you should be doing? We have all heard the statement, “You were too close to the…
Here at Setpoint, we often tout our open-book-finance style of management. To us, open-book-finance means that key financial data is shared with each employee on a weekly basis. Sharing this information with employees isn’t a revolutionary idea per se but training employees to understand…
Today’s brass case factories operate on the principles of traditional mass production techniques, developed in the early 1900’s.  In an effort to maximize efficiencies, machines are grouped in common departments, turned up to run as fast as possible and large inventories are used to…